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20121215
20121215
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consum
scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
at oil versus natural gas in pennsylvania, ohio, new york, where a lot of these problems have popped out. the oil and gas industry folks that we talk to continue to repeat again and again, there are no records of any problems with fracking here in the state. but because they're not being tracked, because we don't know exactly what's happening, you can't make a blanket statement and say that other than we don't knowrepercussions so far. >> if i may -- >> voluntary regulations. i always ask if we had a voluntary speed limit on the highway, how fast would people drive? the question is about this monterey formation. these are beautiful rolling hills south of the salinas valley and the lockwood area. >> that's right. >> this is not an area, though, that's had a whole lot of drilling. as you've pointed out, it's not the same as other parts of the state because the geology is tricky with fault lines and things. how likely do you think it is we're going to see a boom down there versus a few people experimenting and coming up not very economically fweeasible? >> another great question. our first
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

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